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General Discussion · Ave Vol of Past White Candles Only
chessnut1
msg #32571
7/13/2004 12:17:28 AM

As you can tell, I even dropped my ambitious search for 2 times ave volume to a mere 10 percent increase over average volume in order to be sure I wasn't getting 0 returns because of the high requirement. But even with the 10% it produces zip.

--BJ


General Discussion · Ave Vol of Past White Candles Only
chessnut1
msg #32570
7/13/2004 12:13:14 AM

cegis,

Thanks for pointing me in the right logical direction. I may need another nudge however in getting the syntax worked out right, because the following is my best shot, and it's not working. Hope you can point out the error of my ways. :)

Fetcher[find stocks where close is between 1 and 10 and average volume(90) is above 100000 and

set{white10,count(close 10 days ago is greater than open 10 days ago,1)}
set{white9,count(close 9 days ago is greater than open 9 days ago,1)}
set{white8,count(close 8 days ago is greater than open 8 days ago,1)}
set{white7,count(close 7 days ago is greater than open 7 days ago,1)}
set{white6,count(close 6 days ago is greater than open 6 days ago,1)}
set{white5,count(close 5 days ago is greater than open 5 days ago,1)}
set{white4,count(close 4 days ago is greater than open 4 days ago,1)}
set{white3,count(close 3 days ago is greater than open 3 days ago,1)}
set{white2,count(close 2 days ago is greater than open 2 days ago,1)}
set{white1,count(close 1 days ago is greater than open 1 days ago,1)}

set{vol10, count(white10 multiplied by volume 10 days ago)}
set{vol9, count(white9 multiplied by volume 9 days ago)}
set{vol8, count(white8 multiplied by volume 8 days ago)}
set{vol7, count(white7 multiplied by volume 7 days ago)}
set{vol6, count(white6 multiplied by volume 6 days ago)}
set{vol5, count(white5 multiplied by volume 5 days ago)}
set{vol4, count(white4 multiplied by volume 4 days ago)}
set{vol3, count(white3 multiplied by volume 3 days ago)}
set{vol2, count(white2 multiplied by volume 2 days ago)}
set{vol1, count(white1 multiplied by volume 1 days ago)}

and set{Sum1, count(vol10 + vol9)}
set{Sum2, count(Sum1 + vol8)}
set{Sum3, count(Sum2 + vol7)}
set{Sum4, count(Sum3 + vol6)}
set{Sum5, count(Sum4 + vol5)}
set{Sum6, count(Sum5 + vol4)}
set{Sum7, count(Sum6 + vol3)}
set{Sum8, count(Sum7 + vol2)}
set{Sum9, count(Sum8 + vol1)}

set{TotalWhites1, count(white10 + white9)}
set{TotalWhites2, count(TotalWhites1 + white8)}
set{TotalWhites3, count(TotalWhites2 + white7)}
set{TotalWhites4, count(TotalWhites3 + white6)}
set{TotalWhites5, count(TotalWhites4 + white5)}
set{TotalWhites6, count(TotalWhites5 + white4)}
set{TotalWhites7, count(TotalWhites6 + white3)}
set{TotalWhites8, count(TotalWhites7 + white2)}
set{TotalWhites9, count(TotalWhites8 + white1)}

set{AvgVolWhites, Sum9/TotalWhites9}
and volume is more than 10 percent above AvgVolWhites
and add column AvgVolWhites
and set{VolDiff, volume - AvgVolWhites}
and set{VolRatio, VolDiff/AvgVolWhites}
and set{Vol%Chg, VolRatio * 100}
and sort column Vol%Chg descending
]



--BJ



General Discussion · Ave Vol of Past White Candles Only
chessnut1
msg #32555
7/11/2004 9:03:45 PM

Can anyone come up with a way to search for stocks where volume is 2 times greater than the average volume over the last X-number of WHITE [only] Candle days?

My interest is to know how to phrase the average volume of the past 5 white-candle days, skipping, or not counting, the volume of intervening red-candle days.

I am interested in this because a search for volume spikes on the basis of comparing current volume with past X number of days' volume does not differentiate between buying and selling volume.

I realize that one wide-brushed solution is to compare the current day's volume with a longer past period, say, average volume(90), but when I want to compare the current up-day's volume to volume of the past 10 days without counting the red candle days, I'd love to have a way to do that.

Thanks in advance.

--BJ


Filter Exchange · high returns on small stocks
chessnut1
msg #32554
7/11/2004 8:17:58 PM

... meant to add that the stochastics turn-up/crossover is the other way I try to reduce the fals positive effect. I'm sure the MACD could be used as well.

--BJ


Filter Exchange · high returns on small stocks
chessnut1
msg #32553
7/11/2004 6:58:42 PM

stmintz,

So glad you posted about this! I too recently noticed the power of the ema(2)/ma(3) crossover (and the slightly less sensitive ema(3)/ma(5) crossover). It is a very useful and sensitive reversal indicator, and can be successfully added to ANY favorite filter, such as a Bollinger band squeeze, a bottom "muddy"-type filter, a modified Darvas Box filter, etc, to find stocks that have just experienced a bullish price reversal.

However, sensitive is the key word here with the ema2/ma3. I am finding that this is its strength and it's weakness. When you open up any chart and note the crossovers, it becomes evident how sensitive this indicator is, which means it generates a number of "false positives" as well as true reversal points.

So how to keep the power of this early indicator and also minimize the false-positive effect? The solution I've come to is to use a slightly higher crossover setting on my charts -- ema3/ma5-- while maintaining the super-sensitive indicator in the lower portion of my PN charts in the form of the rsi2/rsi3 crossover introduced long ago by HolyGrail. The rsi crossovers corresponds 100% with the ema2/ma3 crossovers, so nothing lost. This way I can have the more reliable (but still very sensitive) ema/ma lines on my upper Prophet.Net charts, and not have to clutter them with 2 more lines to get the more sensitive crossover indicator working for me. [With PN, when you add an ema or ma indicator, it automatically places it in the upper chart area, and it doesn't appear as if it can be placed in the bottom indicator area].

If you happen to be a member of TXTrapper's bottomlines group(http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/bottomlinestocks/?yguid=179439516), or if you join, you will notice my recent posts about the ema3/ma5 (msg 1101 and 1105) and the reference to ema2/ma3 as more sensitive (msg 1149). I posted what I did because like you, I was very exited to discover this tremendously useful and reliable crossover. I highly recommend it.

--BJ


General Discussion · Pricevolume indicator
chessnut1
msg #32289
6/6/2004 8:43:37 PM

Ha, never mind, I experimented and found a way. I simply used this:

set{pricevolume, close*volume} and privevolume is above 1000000 and add column pricevolume


Works fine.

--BJ





General Discussion · Pricevolume indicator
chessnut1
msg #32288
6/6/2004 8:36:45 PM

SF doesn't appear to have a price-vomue indicator (price times volume). Is there a way to search for stocks by pricevolume in the absence of a specific pricevolume indicator?

--BJ


General Discussion · Support and Resistance Lines
chessnut1
msg #31863
4/25/2004 6:21:15 PM

Anyone know of a way to have the resistance lines calculated from the close instead of the high, and the support lines calculated from the open instead of the low?

Many technical analysts consider the top of the highest candlestick's body (for resistance) and the bottom of the lowest candlestick's body (for support) to be the more appropriate points through which to draw trendlines. The idea being that the tips of the shadows represent extremes rather than wider-based consensus points of support and resistance.

--BJ


General Discussion · Just a Heads Up
chessnut1
msg #31791
4/18/2004 1:44:46 PM

If I were new and I posted your question, I would be forever grateful to the person who invited me to consider the filters and methods developed in the Stockfetcher group, otherwise known as the Muddy Method group.

Check out http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/stockfetcher

--BJ

P.S. I now expect you to be officially and forever grateful to me.


Announcements · New Feature: Support and Resistance Lines
chessnut1
msg #31790
4/18/2004 1:33:42 PM

Any way to have the resistance lines calculated from the close instead of the high, and the support lines calculated from the open instead of the low?

As you may be aware, many technical analysts consider the top of the highest candlestick's body (for resistance) and the bottom of the lowest candlestick's body (for support) to be the more appropriate points through which to draw trendlines. The idea being that the tips of the shadows represent extremes rather than wider-based consensus points of support and resistance.

--BJ


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